Let Go of This to Make Quicker Decisions

The Pain of Decision-Making

Should I hit “send” on the email? I’m only asking my acquaintance for more information, after all. My email won’t commit me to joining their zoom group.

Yet even this feels like a decision I’m unprepared to make. I’m torn. I don’t know what to do.

And it’s painful.

If you’re ever caught in this conundrum of making a decision, you understand the feeling.

Discomfort of Uncertainty

You know if you decide too quickly, you might regret it. New information may become available to indicate you made a poor decision. Or you might get locked into something you can’t get out of it, preventing you from taking a better opportunity that comes up later.

However, if you decide too slowly, you could drain away precious time needed for preparation. Or you might respond so late that you miss out on the opportunity altogether.

At the very least, delaying your decision keeps you in an uncomfortable state of uncertainty until the decision is made.

More Info, Please

A few days before my acquaintance’s zoom meeting, I finally do send an email asking a few questions.

Typically, gathering more information is a standard tool to help make a decision.

(But even then, you have to decide how much new information is enough. And the new information can sometimes complicate the matter even further.)

I know the deadline is approaching for the zoom meeting. If I don’t make a decision soon, it’ll be too late.

So I decide to send my email.

Image - Let go of this to make quicker decisions

Release This for Quicker Decisions

And before long, I receive a reply. The information I receive is limited. It tells the meeting time, how to get the zoom link, what’s on the agenda, etc.

But then comes the zinger.

And this becomes the deciding factor:

“Remember, no pressure! Even after the meeting, if you decide it’s not for you, no worries!”

Ah! That does it. I sign up.

As usual, I’d put too much pressure on myself to make the right decision.

While some of our decisions are life-defining, most aren’t. My indecision is too often based on wanting to make the perfect decision.

But rarely is there a perfect decision. There may be a better or worse choice, perhaps more helpful or less helpful, but rarely 100% right or wrong. And even if I do make a poor decision, I’ll still have God’s help to turn it back around.

I’m thankful for that. As I release the pressure of perfectionism, I can make my decisions more quickly instead of too slowly.

I’m glad I’ve now made the decision about the zoom group. At most, it will only cost me two hours of a Saturday morning. Then I can bow out from future meetings if I decide to.

Goodbye, perfectionism.

I gain peace and clarity moving forward.

And I eliminate the discomfort of indecision.


Do you tend to make decisions too quickly or too slowly? What helps you? Share in the comments.

Releasing perfectionism is part of my journey with my one word Release for 2022.

One Word Release 2022

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12 thoughts on “Let Go of This to Make Quicker Decisions

  1. Barbara Harper

    I tend to agonize over decisions. Have you read Anne Bogel’s book on overthinking? That helped a lot. It also helps to realize that few decisions have a perfect choice. Each option will likely have downsides. And most are reversible. For those that aren’t, God has promised to guide us.

    1. LisaNotes Post author

      Glad you mentioned Anne’s book here. It was definitely a help to me too. I still think of it often when I’m at the grocery store and see flowers for sale. I’ve even bought some a time or two as a result. 🙂

      Here’s the link to “Don’t Overthink it” for those who read this comment and want to view the book. The Kindle version is actually on sale right now for only $1.59. Highly recommend!

      https://www.amazon.com/Dont-Overthink-Easier-Decisions-Second-Guessing-ebook/dp/B07VNHCYXQ/

  2. Martha J Orlando

    Don’t Overthink It is a fantastic book, Lisa! I read it two years ago with an online book “club.” I have to admit, before reading it, I didn’t view myself as an overthinker, but quickly realized that I was. What a wake-up call! Makes me want to go back and read this book again.

  3. Bev Rihtarchik

    Lisa,
    I’m afraid my stubborn remnants of perfectionism still cause me to mull over decisions much longer than I should. Is there really a perfect decision? I’ve learned to settle for probability…this is probably a good decision vs. this is absolutely the right decision. It helps take off that awful pressure. Your post title drew me in 😉
    Blessings,
    Bev xx

  4. Trudy

    Great insight, Lisa. I can be so indecisive sometimes. Now this is comforting – “And even if I do make a poor decision, I’ll still have God’s help to turn it back around.” I hope you enjoy your zoom meeting. I love that the person puts on no pressure. Love and blessings to you!

  5. Tea With Jennifer

    Great Post Lisa!
    To answer your question, I have changed over the years, once upon a time I would make informed decisions & be perfectly at peace with them, whatever the outcome once made.

    Since my journey with chronic health issues, I vacillate on decisions which is quite annoying!
    So I understood your journey here.
    Blessings, Jennifer

  6. Lisa Blair

    This is a great insight to your word, RELEASE, Lisa! I appreciate this nugget of truth, “My indecision is too often based on wanting to make the perfect decision. But rarely is there a perfect decision. There may be a better or worse choice, perhaps more helpful or less helpful, but rarely 100% right or wrong. And even if I do make a poor decision, I’ll still have God’s help to turn it back around.” So true! And that truth brings such freedom!

  7. Paula Short

    I used to be a fly by the seat of my pants kinda gal a made quick decisions, sometimes not so great ones. but as I age I’ve gotta tell you I’m so indecisive and it can take a few days for me to make a decision. oh the stress if I have to make a quick decision these days.
    visiting today from Let’s Have Coffee #17&18

  8. Jean Wise

    Good lesson. I am hearing more and more from my soul: slow down. Take your time. All will be well.

    I like to rush decisions. Right now decisions won’t be rushed in my life.

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